About

The Kravis Design Center represents the vision of collector George R. Kravis II to advance public understanding of the meaning and value of design.

Overview

In 2013, George Kravis established the Kravis Design Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma to house the 4,000 objects in his collection and to further his educational mission. The facility is 14,000 square feet of state of the art storage with a gallery space due to be complete in late 2016. 

The Kravis Design Center focuses on international industrial design, covering a wide range of mass-produced objects of everyday life such as furniture, ceramics, metalwork, textiles, appliances, radios, and graphics. Highlights include Wells Coates’s Ekco radio (1932); Alberto Meda’s high-tech LightLight chair made from materials used in aeronautics (1987); Masanori Umeda’s Ginza cabinet, whose shape references Japanese popular culture (1982); and Mathias Bengtsson’s Slice armchair (1999), which comprises 388 sheets of laser-cut three-millimeter plywood glued together.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Kravis Design Center is to advance public understanding of the meaning and value of design. The Kravis Design Center, which collects, displays, and interprets international industrial design from 1900 to the present, represents the vision of collector George R. Kravis II to create a comprehensive design collection with an emphasis on quality and diversity. In its exhibitions and educational programs, the Kravis Design Center documents contemporary and historic innovation in design, celebrates the process through which designs are created and manufactured, and presents the role of design in everyday culture.

Staff

George R. Kravis II, Director
Richard Phillips, Assistant to the Director
David A. Hanks, Curator
Alana Embry, Registrar/Collections Manager
Jonathan Lans, Preparator